Plenary Speakers

Jonathan Haidt, Ph.D.

August 11, 2015|

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Barbara Fredrickson, Ph.D.

August 11, 2015|

Author of Positivity and Love 2.0, Professor Barbara Fredrickson’s most recent research offers an innovative ap-proach to understanding the multiple ways by which positive emotions promote physical health. Most known for her broaden-and-build theory of positive emotions, which identifies positive emotions as key drivers of individual and collective resource building, Dr. Fredrickson’s research reveals how positive emotions alter heart health and molecular physiology. Stepping off from this work, she has more recently developed what she has called the upward spiral theory of lifestyle change. This new integrative model positions positive emotions as creating non conscious and increasing motives for wellness behavior, rooted in enduring biological changes. In this presentation, Dr. Fredrickson will describe the origins of and evidence for this new perspective on how positive emotions promote physical health. Implications for how best to promote positive lifestyle changes are illuminated.

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Mihaly Csiksentmihalyi, Ph.D.

August 11, 2015|

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James Pawelski, Ph.D.

August 11, 2015|

The field of positive psychology was founded nearly twenty years ago when Martin Seligman, along with Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, observed that psychology focused much more on pathology than on well-being. Today, there is a similar overemphasis on pathology and ill-being throughout much of the arts and humanities. This presentation will introduce the nascent field of the positive humanities, which calls for an explicit emphasis on well-being to balance current approaches in literature, music, art, movies, philosophy, history, religion, and other cultural domains. A strategic collaboration between the positive humanities and positive psychology can benefit both fields in their ability to understand, cultivate, and measure well-being. More broadly, such collaboration can benefit humanity by creating new approaches to human flourishing.

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David Cooperrider, PhD.

August 11, 2015|

In this plenary, David Cooperrider explores the proposition that the quest for a flourishing earth is the most significant positive psychology and organization develop-ment opportunity of the 21st century—and that when people in organizations work toward building a sustainable and flourishing world they too are poised to flourish in ways that elevate innovation, personal excellence, and work-place well being.

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Tal Ben-Shahar, Ph.D.

August 11, 2015|

Tal Ben-Shahar is an author and lecturer. He taught two of the largest classes in Harvard University’s
history, Positive Psychology and The Psychology of Leadership. In this plenary presentation from the Fourth World Congress on Positive Psychology, Tal explains why most personal and organizational change efforts fail, and how individuals and organizations can enjoy change that lasts, that goes beyond the “honeymoon period”, by supporting insights with actual behaviors and concrete rituals.

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