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Award

IPPA Awards Program

The International Positive Psychology Association Awards Program began in 2011 to recognize the accomplishments of leaders who make important contributions to the field of positive psychology. The Program will bestow the following awards at the Fifth World Congress on Positive Psychology: Christopher J. Peterson Gold Award, Outstanding Practitioner Award (NEW), Raymond D. Fowler Service Award (NEW), IPPA Fellows, Early Career Researcher (NEW), and Dissertation Awards.

Awards 2017

2011 Award Recipients

2013 Award Recipients

2015 Award Recipients

HatStudent Scholarships

IPPA’s Student Scholarship Program helps students who would otherwise not be able to attend the Fifth World Congress on Positive Psychology take advantage of this unique career and learning opportunity. Visit the Student Scholarship page for more information about the application process or to donate to the fund.

Scholarships

2017 Scholarship Recipients

 

 

Sasha Blickman Sofia El Mouderrib Emilie Eve Gravel
Sasha Blickhan studied philosophy at Oxford University and King’s College London, and positive psychology at ARU Cambridge, UK, where she discovered her passion for positive social psychology. She lives in Munich, Germany, and teaches the science of well-being as a trainer for Applied Positive Psychology at Inntal Institut.

 

Sofia El Mouderrib is a PhD student in neuropsychology at the Université du Québec à Montréal in Quebec, Canada. Under the supervision of Pr. Dave Saint-Amour and Pr. Hugo Théoret, her research focuses on investigating the neurophysiological bases of executive functions by using non-invasive brain stimulation.

 

Emilie Gravel is a Ph.D. Candidate at the University of Ottawa where she is co-supervised by Dr Elke Reissing at the Human Sexuality Laboratory and by Dr Luc Pelletier at the Human Motivation Laboratory. Her research focuses on identifying the motivational factors that shape experiences of sexual well-being.

 

Judith Mangelsdorf Holli-Anne_Passmore_headshot Stéphanie Radziszewski
Judith Mangelsdorf (MAPP, MA, MEd) is a research fellow at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Berlin, Germany. Her research focuses on the linkage between post-traumatic and post-ecstatic growth.

 

Holli-Anne Passmore is a positive psychology researcher focusing on full aliveness, meaning in life, and how connecting with nature can enhance well-being. She is completing her Ph.D. (2018) at the University of British Columbia.

 

Stéphanie Radziszewski is a doctoral student in community psychology at the Université du Québec à Montréal. Her main research interests concern citizen participation, and the well-being of marginalized groups, such as people living in social housing.

 

LisaWagner Jennifer Winkler
Lisa Wagner is a research and teaching assistant the University of Zurich at the department of Personality and Assessment (Prof. Dr. W. Ruch) who focuses on children’s and adolescents’ character strengths and their significance in contexts that are highly relevant to their development, such as schools and peer groups in her PhD research. She also enjoys teaching positive psychology in seminars and the post-graduate continuing education course (Certificate of Advanced Studies in Positive Psychology) at the University of Zurich, which she also coordinates.
Jennifer Winkler has a background in public health with a focus on conflict management as a strategy for health promotion. Her doctoral degree work focused on using the skills and tools of public health to the research and management of conflict. In that work, she explored school discipline and student well being and developed an approach she has called “kind discipline.” Kind discipline defines approaches to address challenging student behavior that will ultimately support students and communities in thriving. In addressing these issues, she brings a focus on proactive approaches to building positive communities in ways that can reduce or mitigate potential conflict. Jennifer Winkler has a background in public health with a focus on conflict management as a strategy for health promotion. Her doctoral degree work focused on using the skills and tools of public health to the research and management of conflict. In that work, she explored school discipline and student well being and developed an approach she has called “kind discipline.” Kind discipline defines approaches to address challenging student behavior that will ultimately support students and communities in thriving. In addressing these issues, she brings a focus on proactive approaches to building positive communities in ways that can reduce or mitigate potential conflict.